Combining Economics and Social Norms: Making the Energy Switch

James Sweeney
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Stanford, CA
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Expertise:
Energy Economy

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James Sweeney
Dir. Precourt Institute of Energy Efficiency
Stanford
James Sweeney is a world renowned energy expert who can discuss economic policy and analysis, natural resource issues, energy economics and depletable and renewable resources usage.
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English
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ISDN Line available
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Stanford, CA 94305
United States
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Biography

James (Jim) Sweeney, is Director of the Precourt Institute for Energy Efficiency; Professor of Management Science and Engineering; Senior Fellow of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research; Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace; and Senior Fellow of the Stanford Institute for International Studies. His professional activities focus on economic policy and analysis, particularly in energy, natural resources, and the environment.

At Stanford he has served as chairman of the Department of EnginProfessor James L. Sweeney is Director of the Precourt Institute for Energy Efficiency, Professor of Management Science and Engineering, an affiliated faculty member of the Department of Economics, and a Senior Fellow of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. Until September 1999, he served as chairman of the Stanford Department of Engineering-Economic Systems and Operations Research.

He has focused his professional activities on the application of economics methods and mathematical modeling, particularly to natural resource issues, energy economics, environmental economics, competitive analysis, and policy analysis. He has conducted theoretical research on depletable and renewable resource use, environmental economics, gasoline market dynamics, energy tariff policy, and housing market dynamics. He has conducted empirical research on energy demand, electricity demand and financial forecasting, and geothermal energy market behavior. Along with Alan Kneese, he was editor of the three volume Handbook of Natural Resource and Energy Economics, part of the North Holland Handbooks in Economics series.

At Stanford he has served as the Director of the Energy Modeling Forum for seven years, the Chairman of the Institute for Energy Studies, and the Director of the Center for Economic Policy Research (now named the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research). He has served as coeditor of the Journal Resource and Energy Economics and serve on the editorial board of The Energy Journal. He was a founding member of the International Association for Energy Economics and has served as its vicepresident for publications. He has been a member of several committees of the National Research Council (the operating branch of the National Academy of Science and the National Academy of Engineering) and until recently served on the Board on Energy and Environmental System. He is a Fellow of the California Council on Science and Technology. He currently is a member of the review panel for the Public Interest Energy Research Program run by the state of California.

In the early 1970's he served as Director of the Office of Energy Systems Modeling and Forecasting of the U.S. Federal Energy Administration. In that role he was responsible for the development and the use of the energy supply and demand models used by the U.S. Federal government for its energy policy analysis and for its forecasting of energy supply and demand. He personally developed the structural/econometric model of gasoline demand used by that agency.

He periodically serves as a consultant or advisor to Exxon Corporation, ARCO, the American Petroleum Institute, Charles River Associates, Cornerstone Research, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Department of Energy. He has served as an expert witness in a number of energy litigations in natural gas, oil, and electricity industries in the United States and in New Zealand.


Recent Publications/Appearances

INTERVIEWS/ PUBLICATIONS:

March 18, 2013 "Solar power faces obstacles of practicality in commercial adoption"

May 23, 2012  Price of oil tumbles below $90 per barrel

March 5, 2012 UPI "Expert: Gasoline a global commodity"

February 21, 2012 Vail Daily "Energy forum hopes to spark creativity"

"Quality, Commodity Hierarchies, and Housing Markets", Econometrica, Volume 42, No. 1, January 1974, pp. 147-167.


"Housing Unit Maintenance and the Mode of Tenure", Journal of Economic Theory, Volume 8, No. 2, June 1974, pp. 111-138.

"A Commodity Hierarchy Model of the Rental Housing Market", Journal of Urban Economics, Volume 1, No. 3, July 1974, pp. 288-323.

"Economics of Depletable Resources: Market Forces and Intertemporal Bias", Review of Economic Studies, Volume 44, No. 1, February 1977, pp. 125-141.

Reprinted in The Economics of Exhaustible Resources, Geoffrey Heal (ed.), Edward Elgar Publishing, Ltd., London, 1993.

"Optimal Growth with Depletable Resources", with li. C. Garg, Resources and Energy, Volume 1, No. 1, 1978, pp. 43-56.

Macroeconomic Impacts of Energy Shocks: Bert G. Hickman, Hillard Huntington, James Sweeney (eds.), North Holland, 1987.

Handbook of Natural Resource and Energy Economics: A.V. Kneese and James L. Sweeney (ed.), North Holland,Volumes I and II, 1985; Volume III, 1993.

" Economic Theory of Depletable Resources:  An Introduction" in Handbook of Natural Resource and Energy Economics: A.V. Kneese and James L. Sweeney (ed.), North Holland,Volumes I and II, 1985; Volume III, 1993.

Fuels to Drive our Future, Committee on Production Technologies for Liquid Transportation Fuels, National Research Council, National Academy Press, Washington D.C. 1990. Principal Author, Chapter 3 and Appendix D.

The National Energy Modeling System , Committee on the National Energy Modeling System, National Research Council, National Academy Press, Washington D.C. 1992. Principal Author, Chapter 3: "NEMS Architecture".


"Natural Resource Economics," in The Social Science Encyclopedia , Edition 2, Routledge
Energy Research at DOE:  Was It Worth It?   Committee on Benefits of DOE R&D in Energy Efficiency and Fossil Energy. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.  July 17, 2001.

Effectiveness and Impact of Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards.   Committee on Effectiveness and Impact of Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.  July 30, 2001.

" Energy Economics," International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences.   November, 2001, pp. 4513-20.

"Tradable Fuel Economy Credits: Analysis and Text Extended from Chapter 5 of Impact and Effectiveness of Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards " , Working Paper, August 12, 2001.

The California Electricity Crisis . Hoover Institution Press.  Forthcoming, June 2002.

The California Electricity Crisis:  Lessons for the Future.  The Bridge.  June 2002.
The Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities, Costs, Barriers, and R&D Needs. Committee on Alternatives and Strategies for Future Hydrogen Production and Use. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. July 2004

“An Energy Policy for the Twenty-first Century”, Hoover Digest, 2005, No. 1. pp. 33-36.
Prospective Evaluation of Applied Energy Research and Development at DOE (Phase One): A First Look Forward. Committee on Prospective Benefits of DOE’s Energy Efficiencey and Fossil Energy R&D Programs (Phase One.) National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. 2005.

“California Electricity Restructuring, the Crisis, and its Aftermath;” Chapter 10 in Electricity Market Reform: An International Perspective, Perry Shioshansi and Wolfgang Pfaffenberger (eds.) Elsevier, April 2006

“Hydrogen for Light Duty Vehicles: Opportunities and Barriers in the United States”, Chapter 17 in Human-Induced Climate Change: An Interdisciplinary Assessment; Michael Schlesinger (Ed.), Cambridge University Press (forthcoming, 2007)

National Security Consequences of U.S. Oil Dependency. Independent Task Force Report No. 58, Council on Foreign Relations, 2006.

Prospective Evaluation of Applied Energy Research and Development at DOE (Phase Two.) Committee on Prospective Benefits of DOE’s Energy Efficiencey and Fossil Energy R&D Programs (Phase Two). National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. 2007.








 

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