The Double Standard: Are Women Not Allowed to Express Emotion in Law?

Terry Maroney
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Nashville, TN
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Expertise:
Justice & Law Social Science

Certified:


Terry Maroney
Associate Professor of Law
Vanderbilt University Law School
Terry Maroney can discuss Supreme Court decision-making, law and emotion, race and gender in law, and criminal and juvenile justice.
Interview Language:
English
Facilities:
ISDN Line available On-site Flash/Recording studio available
Contact Information:
***@***
Phone:
***-***-****
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Location:
Nashville, TN 37203
United States
Representative:
Jim Patterson
More contact detail.

Biography

Terry Maroney specializes in criminal law and juvenile justice, drawing heavily on psychology and neuroscience. Maroney also is a leader in the emerging interdisciplinary movement exploring the role of emotion in law. In addition to her scholarship in that area, she co-organized an important conference, "Law and the Emotions: New Directions in Scholarship," held at Berkeley Law. Professor Maroney’s article, “Emotional Common Sense as Constitutional Law,” was recently published in the Vanderbilt Law Review, and another article, "The False Promise of Adolescent Brain Science in Juvenile Justice," is forthcoming in the Notre Dame Law Review (2009). She is the author of two prior works on law and emotion: “Emotional Competence, ‘Rational Understanding', and the Criminal Defendant,” which appeared in the American Criminal Law Review (2006), and "Law and Emotion: A Proposed Taxonomy of an Emerging Field," which appeared in Law and Human Behavior (2006). Her other writings include a widely-cited note on hate crime, "The Struggle Against Hate Crime: Movement at a Crossroads," which was selected for inclusion in Structured Inequality in the United States: Discussions on the Continuing Relevance of Race, Ethnicity, and Gender. Professor Maroney joined Vanderbilt's law faculty in 2006 after serving as a Law Fellow at the University of Southern California Gould School of Law. Before her fellowship at USC, Professor Maroney was a Furman Fellow at New York University School of Law, a litigation associate at WilmerHale, and a Skadden Fellow at the Urban Justice Center. After earning her J.D. summa cum laude at New York University, she also clerked for The Honorable Amalya L. Kearse, United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. She spent six years working as a rape crisis counselor, an HIV educator, and an advocate for crime victims at the New York City Gay and Lesbian Anti-Violence Project after her graduation from Oberlin College.


Recent Publications/Appearances

INTERVIEWS:

February 26, 2013 AP "Judges learn it's human to have feelings on bench"

August 16, 2011 USA Today "Did prosecutors taint Memphis murder trial?"

August 3, 2010 TSN The Science Studio

 

PUBLISHED WORKS:

http://"Emotional Common Sense as Constitutional Law," 62 Vanderbilt Law Review 851 (2009)

"The False Promise of Adolescent Brain Science in Juvenile Justice," 85 Notre Dame Law Review (forthcoming 2009)

“Emotional Competence, ‘Rational Understanding,' and the Criminal Defendant,” 43 American Criminal Law Review 1375 (2006)

“Law and Emotion: A Proposed Taxonomy of an Emerging Field,” 30 (2) Law and Human Behavior 119 (2006)

Note, “The Struggle Against Hate Crime: Movement at a Crossroads,” 73 New York University Law Review 564 (1998). Reprinted in Structured Inequality in the United States: Discussions on the Continuing Significance of Race, Ethnicity, and Gender 370 (Adalberto Aguirre, Jr. & David V. Baker eds., Prentice Hall, 2000)

papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm








 

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